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less than a week to get a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. not a lot of time. how did we get to this point? taking you back to last week, you remember john boehner tried to get that alternative bill through the house. his own bill. he didn't have the support to do it. it fell apart. now things are in the senate and it will be up to harry reid and mitch connell and the president to try to come to a compromise to avoid the tax hikes and spending cuts that go into effect on the first of the year. president obama had been working with house speaker john boehner and trying to get a big deal that dealt with tax reform and deficit reduction. that fell apart and talks have largely been stalled this entire time. there was a lost pressure to get something done. we have seen some of the impacts of the fiscal cliff. consumers saying they have been more cautious with their holiday spending because of the uncertainty in washington. economists warn it could get worse and the markets could be foiled if we go over the fiscal cliff. taxes will go up for the average american by about $2,000 and
of americans who think congress will negotiate a deal on the fiscal cliff. that's not all, holiday spending also hit its lowest rate since the 2008 recession, which retailers are blaming on the uncertainty in washington. so where do we go from here? well, since the house failed to get a vote on the tax package last week, all eyes are on the senate. a temporary deal that would basically extend all the tax cuts for those making under a quarter million. the deal would also rescue long-term unemployment benefits and instead of addressing those automatic spending cuts we've all heard about that are set for january 1st, this temporary deal would delay them for another six months. few are optimistic this new plan, if we do go over the clifr, would work out. so what would half if we go over the cliff? the payroll tax holiday will expire on new year's day. that means most people will start paying more taxes in each paycheck. another 21 million americans would lose federal emergency unemployment benefits and those, let's remember, are people struggling the most right now. across the entire economy go
. the president said he is modestly optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal getting done before new year's eve. >> clayton: they all said the same thing. presidential meeting with the leaders yesterday. harry reid. >> juliet: vice president showed up. >> clayton: they must have been all on the same table hey whether we lee this table we will say modestly optimistic. listen to senator mitch mcconnell who may be the linchpin of this whole thing. he said i will take the ball and run with it in the senate. get a deal done. listen to the senator. >> we had a good meeting at the white house. we are engaged in discussions the majority leader and myself and the white house in the hopes that we can come forward sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. we will be working hard to see if we can get there in the next 24 hours. so i'm hopeful and optimistic. >> charles krauthammer calling him a master negotiator. saying if it were left up to him he could solve the syrian civil war in a weekend. >> dave: he can get it done but there
that the sh we're dealing with right now in the fiscal cliff is a prime example of it. what i'm arguing for are maintaining tax cuts for 98% of americans. i don't think anybody would consider that some liberal, left wing agenda. it used to be considered a mainstream agenda. and it's something we can accomplish today if we simply allow for a vote in the senate and in the house to get it done. the fact that it's not happening is ancation of, you know, how far certain factions inside the republican party have gone where they can't even accept what used to be centrist mainstream positions on these issues. i'm an optimist. we try every other option before we finally do the right thing. after everything else is exhausted, we eventually do the right thing. and i think that's true for congress, as well. and i think it's important for americans to remember politics have always been messy. people have been asking me a lot about the film "lincoln" and -- >> is this your lincoln moment? >> well, no. look, i never compare myself to lincoln and, b, the magnitude of the issues are quite different from
senator lindsey graham. >>> plus, eight days before the fiscal cliff. what are prospects for a deal. and the round table or the president's priorities in the new year. that's all ahead. fiscal cliff. fiscal cliff. whatirping ][ cellphon [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. how much is your current phone bill? four sixteen seventy six a month! okay, come with me -- we're gonna save you money. with straight talk at walmart, you get unlimited talk, text and data for only $45 a month per phone. would we get the same coverage? same coverage on america's best networks. you saved $146.76 by switching to straight talk. awesome! now you can afford to share your allowance with me. get the season's hottest smartphones like the samsung galaxy s2 and get straight talk with unlimited data for just $45 a month -- from america's gift headquarters. walmart. ♪ >>> since we announce
, thank you. >>> here in washington, hope is fading for a deal before the country reaches the fiscal cliff just eight days from now and we are counting really by the hour at this point until we go over the edge. congress and the president are not here. they have stopped trying for now. home from the holidays and not that optimistic about a christmas miracle. listen to retiring senator joe liberman on "state of the union." >> i feel it's more likely we will go over the cliff than not, and that -- if we allow that to happen, it will be the most colossal consequential act of congressional irresponsibility in a long time. maybe ever, in american history. >> are white house correspondent prix anna kebrianna keilar is traveling with the president and joins us from hawaii. >> they can still talk, right? true. but the people who matter are not. perhaps the lines of xhoukz are open between the white house and senate democrats. but the white house at this point is not in discussion with not only speaker john boehner but the senate minority leader, mitch mcconnell and perhaps because of that, you hav
to put together a deal to arod the fiscal cliff. time for our sunday group, bill kristol. evan bayh, byron york and kirsten powers. well, bill, you just heard mitch mcconnell say he is hopeful and optimistic. will congress pass something in the next 48 hours, something to avoid the fiscal cliff? >> i don't know. but i guess probably. and it will be a bad deal but i suppose better than doing nothing. amazing every working american's taxes will go up on january 1. they are doing nothing about the payroll tax which is a big increase, 2%. and we will have totally irresponsible defense cuts. everybody agrees this is probably bad policy to have middle class americans taxes go up and this is what congress thinks is a good deal. >> chris: i'm not sure they think it is a good deal but a deal that avoids the worst of the fiscal cliff. senator bayh, obviously we don't know what is your sense? no filibuster in the senate. you heard what lindsey graham said and do republicans pass whatever it is that the senate agrees to? >> i think the odds are some what better than 50/50, chris, that we get a
as these issues are hanging. so we get a fiscal cliff this deal and i think he's going to be gone by the end of the month but i think it's kind of up t in the air. host: says a contender for his job would be jack lew. guest: that's the betting money. is his job if he wants it. and there's some question if he wants it. that's a big commitment. i think he would be expected to stay for the entire term. he has been a white house official throughout the time. so the question is if he wents to take it and if he wents it he'll probably get it. host: where did he come from before chief of staff? guest: he's been in government for a long time. he was the budget director for president clinton. he was on wall street during the bush. but he basically made his bones in the government. he was a long-time assistant to former house speaker tip o'neal. he helped put together the social security deal so he's been involved with budget issues for quite some time in the 80s and 90s. host: christina next. caller: thanks for c-span. host: go ahead. caller: thank you so much for c-span. i'm having a problem because
on the last-ditch effort to put together a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff and it is time now for our sunday group, bill kristol of the weekly standard, former democratic senator evan byah and byron york from the washington examiner and kirsten powers of the daily beast web site. you heard mitch mcconnell say he's hopeful and optimistic. will congress pass something in the next 48 hours, something? to avoid the fiscal cliff? >> i don't know. but, i guess, probably. and it will be a bad deal but i suppose better than doing nothing. and, every working american's taxes will go up january 1st if they do nothing about the payroll tax, a pretty big increase, and, defense cuts and everyone agrees, with that policy to have middle class americans' taxes go up, and, it totally irresponsible defense cuts and this is what congress thinks is a good deal. >> chris: i'm not sure it is a good deal but avoids the worst of the fiscal cliff. senator bayh -- obviously, we don't know, what is your sense, no filibuster in the senate? you heard lindsay graham and do republicans pass whatever the senate agrees to?
intractable debate and that's the fiscal cliff. congress has left town and there's no deal here. senator schumer, the president is now proposing a smaller deal. are we going to avoid the fiscal cliff by the first of the year or not? >> i hope so. if you look at the final positions last monday of both the president and speaker boehner, they were this close, they were this close to a solution. the president was about $200 billion higher on revenues, speaker boehner $200 billion higher on spending cuts. out of a $4 trillion budget, that doesn't seem insurmountable. so i hope they would keep talking. my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this -- you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both and he has put himself with plan b in sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right guys to go along with him. if he were to say and the president were to say we're going to pass a bill with a majority of democrats and majority of democrats in the house and senate we could get a mainstream bill. i know he's worried about his speakership but w
to reach a deal, the impact is as unlikely as immediate as the term "fiscal cliff" seems to imply. the expiration of the tax cuts with a $2200 average tax high. the payroll tax cut would also expire meaning another $40 a paycheck and long-term unemployment benefits would end for 2 million americans. while these elements could have a recession-inducing effect, they could undo those measures shortly after the first of the year. estimations are if we do go over the cliff it would be the third quarter which the recession may hit. when be look at the issue of a -- the markets, however, may feel the brunt of the fiscal cliff fallout. the dow fell on friday after the deal failed the night before. last week fitch warned it may downgrade the u.s. credit rating if congress cannot reach a deal. some lawmakers are angling for the best political outcountry. >> when i listen to the president, i think he's eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. he gets all this additional tax revenue for new programs, gets to cut the military which democrats have been calling for for years, and he ge
passed to deal with the fiscal cliff that are now over the united states senate. if the senate wants to do anything with them, amend them and send them back to the house and perhaps the house will act on it. essentially what boehner is saying is we're not making any moves until the senate amends the two bills we passed over or sends a new one. what are in those bills? well, they essentially extend the bush tax cuts permanently for all earners. and then to avert the sequester and other types of cuts, they make what a lot of liberals have called draconian cuts to meals on wheels, food stamps. it goes into discretionary spending. the house passed bills are absolutely would go nowhere. and would be vee toad by president obama. so this is what we're seeing on the statement the day after christmas is while you guys figure out some solution, we wash our hands of it. >> as a follow-up, i'm putting my press secretary hat on for a second and say the response i would expect from the democratic side from the senate is hey, we passed a bill too. we passed a bill that does the same thing. why don'
to avoid a fiscal cliff. will a deal get done? a newspaper under heavy criticism now for publishing the names of local gun permit legal local gun permit holders online. details on that are next on n "news nation." e reached the age where you don't back down from a challenge. this is the age of knowing how to make things happen. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up a
is coming back to washington to try to reach a deal on avoiding the fiscal cliff. he now has less than a week until automatic tax hikes and sending cuts go into effect and the way out of this mess isn't clear. here's our senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. >> lisa, house republican leaders who are home for christmas held a conference call this afternoon to talk about when the house should come back in session. two gop sources tell me they did not make a decision. it's still up in the air. a reason for that is, if anything can get done in the next six days, the ball is in the senate's court. >>> the capital is a ghost town. the halls are empty, neither chamber in session. an eerie calm, since the fiscal cliff, only the congress has the power to avert, is less than one week away. at their homes for the holiday, the senate democratic leaders are trying to figure out if the president's scaled back bill, keeping middle class tax cuts in place, can pass congress at the 11th hour. >> there is absolutely no reason, none, not to protect these americans from a tax hike. at the very le
of the tax rates. we did deal with the fiscal cliff issues weeks have passed that. it's harry reid and the president that have yet to come up with something. if it was so easy, if they thought they had a solution to it, why didn't on friday they come to the table and actually pass something? the pressure is on them, what can they pass in the senate? >> harold, you know the politics of this but you also know the markets and how they've been reacting and wall street and corporate america more generally. is there new pessimism that we're, a, not going to get a deal and not solve the issue anyway? >> big disappointment. people outside of washington understand clearly. a couple hundred billion over ten years separating both sides. the question becomes can washington still govern itself? two, there's a realization we're in the middle of a small recovery. if we find ourselves not able to resolve this moment, it retards and slows and undermines what we see ourselves doing going forward. finally, for the life of me as someone who sfrd there, it was so distressful to watch both sides yell at
of even short-term deal to avoid going over that fiscal cliff on january 1. so no surprise the market's in negative territory. you've got the numbers right there in front of us right from the opening. now, on the flip side the markets had priced in some kind of a deal and that's why post election day we had seen the markets overall going up. but right now make no mistake about it, the fiscal cliff doubts in getting to january 1 without some kind of even a patchwork deal is what's driving the markets right now in negative territory. >> as we know, it's not a cliff, it's really a slope or series of steps as you're falling down them should a deal not come to pass here. is the drop that we've seen so far after plan b's failure, will we see yet more of the market reacting, a slow degradation of market performance? >> that depends on essentially if, for instance, a week from monday right now we're sitting here and it's almost a certainty that we're going to go over the cliff. i would argue that we could get more back to a cliff rather than slope analogy because it comes down to how swiftly
go over the so-called fiscal cliff. senate leaders spent the weekend working on a last-ditch deal and the house comes back today for a rare sunday night session. yesterday afternoon in an exclusive interview, president obama sat down with me in the blue room of the white house to discuss the way forward and his priorities for a second term. mr. president, welcome back to "meet the press." >> it's great to be here. thank you. >> so the obvious question, are we going over the fiscal cliff? >> well, i think we're going to find out in the next 48 hours what congress decides to do. but i think it's important for the american people to understand exactly what this fiscal cliff is. because it's actually not that complicated. the tax cuts that were introduced in 2001, 2003, 2010, those were extended, and they're all about to expire at the end of the year. so on midnight, december 31st, if congress doesn't act, then everybody's taxes go up. and for the average family, that could mean a loss of $2,000 in income. for the entire economy, that means consumers have a lot less money to make purc
to continue to drive me. and i think that the issue that we're dealing with right now in the fiscal cliff is a prime example of it. what i'm arguing for are intaining tax cuts for 98% of americans. i don't think anybody would consider that some liberal left-wing agenda. that used to be considered a pretty mainstream republican agenda. and it's something that we can accomplish today. if we simply allow for a vote in the senate and in the house to get it done. the fact that it's not happening is an indication of you know, how far certain factions inside the republican party have gone where they, they can't even accept what used to be considered centrist mainstream positions on these issues. now i remain optimistic, i'm just a congenital optimist, that eventually people kind of see the light. winston churchill used to say that we americans, we try every other option before we finally dot right thing. after everything else is exhausted, we eventually do the right thing. and i think that that's true for congress as well. and i think it's also important for americans to remember that politic ha
on cups to push members of congress to come to a deal on the fiscal cliff. shultz followed up with a blog saying everyone should put the pressure on congress. >>> a cartoonist went a more pessimistic approach. a box labeled deficit crisis compromised saying do not open until with all the holidays crossed out signed by boehner and obama. >>> all featured on politico's list of the top viral videos of 2012. the politico ones, of course. here's a look back. >> in the silvery moonlight that bathes every town, the people lie dreaming so safe and so sound. they're warm in their beds, snuggled up in the sheets. but four years before, they were out in the streets. sorry, my friend, but there's no time to snore. we're all on our own if romney has his way. and he's against safety nets. if you fall, tough luck. so i strongly suggest that you wake the [ bleep ] up. >> there's only one thing that might deny us the presidency that is the god-given property and he's against safety nets. if you fall, tough luck. so i strongly suggest that you wake the [ bleep ] up. >> there's only one thing that might den
the answers in minutes. >>> we start with optimism as a last words that comes to mind with the fiscal cliff and with just a week left for talks left, la lawmakers are saying a deal is looking less likely than ever. >> it's a first time i feel it's more likely that we'll go over the cliff than not. and that -- if we allow that to happen it will be the most coloss colossal, consequential act of congressional irresponsibility in a long time. maybe ever in american history because of the immaterial pact on almost every single american. >> what will happen to an average american paycheck in a deal is not reached by january 1st? joining me now, washington bureau correspondent hampton pearson. let's see what the average american will or won't be seeing in their pi check. >> reporter: i'm here for the lump of coal portion of the program. if there's no deal, let's look at what happens to tax rates in just seven days and these stats are from the tax policy center. the annual income from somebody in the $50,000 to $75,000, about a $2,400 increase. jumping ahead to $100,000 to $200,000, the average tax
before we go over the so-called fiscal cliff. senate leaders spent the weekend working on a last-ditch deal, and the house comes back for a rare sunday night session. yesterday afternoon in an exclusive interview, president obama sat down with me in the blue room of the white house to discuss the way forward and his priorities for a second term. >>> mr. president, welcome back to "meet the press." >> great to be here. thank you. >> the obvious question, are we going to go over the fiscal cliff? >> we'll find out in the next 48 hours what congress will decide to do. but i think it's important for the american people to understand exactly what this fiscal cliff is. it's actually not that complicated. the tax cuts that were introduced in 2001, 2003, 2010, those were extended, and they are all about to expire at the end of the year. so on midnight december 31, if congress doesn't act, then everybody's taxes go up. and for the average family, that could mean a loss of $2,000 in income. for the entire economy, that means consumers have a lot less money to make purchases, which means bu
this fiscal cliff and we're going to deal with it over the next few days or few weeks. but unfortunately, for our country, every american's quality of life is going to be lesser than it should be because now this is going to drag on to the debt ceiling. we're going to have the same thing play out. >> the president says he's not going to play games, not going to play politics. >> i think he should lay out the reductions. we set the precedent on a dollar for a dollar, dollar increase in debt ceiling for a dollar in reductions. i actually laid out a bill to do that this week with lamar alexander. but i think what's been missing here, candy, is it appears to me that the president either lacks the courage or the will to lay out those specific things that need to happen because i assure you, if he would lay those out, the house would take it up, the senate would take it up, and we could move this behind us and we can start this next year with the wind at our back in this fiscal issue behind us like most of us would like to do. >> you know and i know that's not going to happen in the short time
of the huffington post. partisan ranker and frustration all around, we've arrived at the fiscal cliff. the senate, which was expected to hold an up and down vote on a final bare bones budget deal last night wasn't quite able to make it happen. harry reid gave us problem or lack thereof. >> there are two sides still apart, and negotiations are continuing as i speak. there's still more before we can bring ledges laying to the floor. what else is new? can anyone save this congress from itself? turns out the new man responsible is vice president joe biden. yep. that's right. joe biden is the latest person to be called on to try to get congress out of the straight jacket they've put themselves in. the vp and senate minority leader mitch mcconnell exchanged phone calls until midnight last night and again this morning, and appeared to be zeroing in on a tax rate compromise in the region of a $450,000 to $550,000 threshold. a higher rate than the president's earlier compromise as well as an agreement on the estate tax. sticking points remain. president obama seemed resigned to going over the cliff. >> if
. and this is problematic obviously because in order to avoid the fiscal cliff, you would need to find some sort of deal that would make it through the senate and the house and that would need democratic and republican support. now, all eyes on the senate because they will reconvene on the 27th, thursday. and senate majority leader harry reid, it is up to him, really, to cobble together something that can get some of that support. right now the white house is still supporting a threshold of $250,000 back to their initial starting point for tax rates going up for those making more than that. but you can imagine, hala, that's going to be very hard for some republicans, maybe even some democrats to sign on to. >> right. and for just about a week ago, it was common to hear a deal will be hammered out. over the last several days we're hearing more and more that potentially this is a reality for americans in eight days' time. your sources in the administration, is there a real concern among some of the people you're speaking with that indeed this fiscal cliff will become a reality? >> i thi >> reporter: i thi
one week left before the country goes over the fiscal cliff. your taxes will soar if congress and the president can't reach a deal. so steve is live for us in washington with the very latest. all right, good morning to you, steve. >> good morning, gretchen. yeah, the house as you know, tried and failed to pass some kind of a compromise on that fiscal cliff. now the spotlight falls on the u.s. senate. some kind of deal could have a better chance there because the senate is not as bitterly divided as the house. success depends partly on whether mitch mcconnell decides to filibuster any legislation. there is senate republicans who are willing to compromise in order to avoid the fiscal cliff. including kay bailey hutchison of texas and johnny isakson of georgia. >> time is running out. and the truth of the matter is, if we do fall off the cliff after the president's maturitied, he'll come back, propose just what he proposed yesterday in leaving washington and we'll end up adopting it. why should we put the markets mn such turmoil and the people in misunderstanding or lack of confi
vacation for the hard reality of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the president called all four congressional leaders last night in an effort to reach a deal, but did that call fall on deaf ears? jared bernstein, former chief economist to vip biden, as well as a contributor. i want to start with the new statement from senator mitch mcconnell's office coming out says last night he called other lead serious. the leader is happy to review what the president has in mind, but to day date the majority has not put forward a plan. jared, is that good they're actually speaking, however far apart as it may sound, at least they're talking? >> it's a bit good. better to be talking than north. the unfortunate thing are the words they're saying. i don't hear much compromise or kind of conciliation in the statements we've heard thus far. i do hear a lot of theatrics, you go first, no you go first. it's strange to say the democrats haven't put forth any legislation on this, because in fact they have. in fact, a democratic majority in the senate passed a bill that's pretty similar to the compromise that the p
to avoid the most immediate economic impacts of the fiscal cliff. with 15 hours to go and counting, members of congress are disgusted and embarrassed. >> when the future of the country, you know, rests in the hands of 70 and 80-year-olds who have jet lag, it's probably not the best thing. >> something has done terribly wrong when the biggest threat to our american economy is our american congress. >> the senate will reconvene at 11:00 this morning, but after a day of public gamesmanship and little obvious progress behind the scenes on sunday. >> there's still significant distance between the two sides, but negotiations continue. >> i want everyone to know i'm willing to get this done, but i need a dance partner. >> mitch mcconnell called on vice president joe biden to be that dance partner. biden has brokered 11th-hour deals with the republican leader in the past. mcconnell's appeal came just hours after the president appeared on "meet the press" and called out republican leaders by name. >> congress has not been able to get this stuff done, not because democrats in congress don't want to g
in talks. at the top of that list, tax rates. if we go over the fiscal cliff, tax rates will go up 9% to 33% for most all americans. that would also mean havoc for payroll companies and the irs that would have to struggle with how to handle withholding starting on january 1st. also unemployment benefits, those actually ran out today. that's something that republicans and democrats, we understand, are talking about right now. what else is at stake in the fiscal cliff? let's look at some other issues, things that we're not sure will be in a deal that comes out this week. at the top of that list, government spending cuts. that's about 8% to 10% in cuts to most every federal agency. also a pay cut for medicare doctors of 27% that would hit after january 1st. finally, don, there are a slew of other tax hikes. the alternative minimum tax is one that people talk about. the estate tax. these are all things that would affect average americans and which would hit on january 1st. so the fiscal cliff, it might be even bigger than people realize. don? >> lisa, thank you very much. >>> we've got a lot mo
the fiscal cliff, tax rates will go up 9% to 33% for most all americans. that would also mean havoc for payroll companies and the irs that would have tro stro struggh how to handle withholding starting on january 1st. also unemployment benefits, those actually ran out today. that's something that republicans and democrats, we understand, are talking about right now. what else is at stake in the fiscal cliff? let's look at some other issues, things that we're not sure will be in a deal that comes out this week. at the top of that list, government spending cuts. that's about 8% to 10% in cuts to most every federal agency. also a pay cut for medicare doctors of 27% that would hit after january 1st. finally, don, there are a slew of other tax hikes. the alternative minimum tax is one that people talk about. the estate tax. these are all things that would affect average americans and which would hit on january 1st. so the fiscal cliff, it might be even bigger than people realize. don? >> lisa, thank you very much. >>> we've got a lot more planned for you this saturday night. here's what
the fiscal cliff. meanwhile, president obama cut his hawaii vacation short to return to washington today. but has he been working on a deal? "outfront" tonight, reports from both ends of pennsylvania avenue. chief white house correspondent, jessica yellin, and senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. jessica, first, to you, the president's back in washington, wheels down. he left his christmas vacation early. but was this just a bit of showmanship, or has he been working on something specific? >> reporter: hey, john. well, today has been a bit of a quiet day here at the white house. publicly, the president has been scarce, no sign of him. behind closed doors, i'm told a few meetings internally, but mostly, relatively quiet. i expect we will see more from the president, perhaps we could even see him publicly tomorrow. perhaps he could even meet with or talk to some of the congressional leaders. the president's role in all of this, he can get each of the leaders to come closer on what the white house believes is already, pretty clearly, the framework for a final deal, and he can also
. stock market closes at 1:00 eastern. >> exactly. stocks are trending lower because of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the dow is down 41 points. this follows the loss on friday. the way wall street sees it, unless there's a deal reached, this could be the trend for stocks in the short-term. even if there's a band-aid measure thrown together, wall street may see that more of a positive. it looks pretty bleak as far as the fiscal cliff goes. >> let's get back to gas prices. you would think a 93 million people traveling more than 50 miles for the holiday season that gas prices would go up. but they have consecutively gone down. what's the reason behind this and will it last? >> there are a few reasons. it's winter and the peak drive ing season is over. it's all about the law of supply and demand. supply is up so demand goes down. you see gas prices moving lower. but also because demand for gas is down because of the fiscal cliff. the big worries about the fiscal cliff and how that's going to affect the economy as a whole. you look at oil prices and they have barely moved since late october
and when. the fiscal cliff could hurt a little or a lot. at least in the short run. that is up to the government and the choices the government makes for the first weeks or month or two at least. for instance, the irs, the internal revenue service can decide what to do about how they treat the tax increase. the agency could delay increasing the amount it withholds from your paycheck each week assuming congress would reach a deal. that way you wouldn't notice the tax increase before it turned around. if it didn't get reversed, you're going to get quite a bill from the taxman. also if we go over the cliff, and the spending cuts begin to take hold, the various agencies of the federal government can consider putting employees on furlough. meaning they take unpaid days off. that's considered a better alternative than layoffs, if we don't get a deal quickly, the furloughs will have to become layoffs, that will mean real pain. >>> the great question is how quickly that pain will begin. would it hurt the real economy before we get a deal? or would the prospect of pain create such press
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)